What goes into a Moccer’s Build Process?

While building Lego sets can be fun, especially those cool Star Wars themed sets, there are people who would go about and create their own builds out of the sets they bought, or by collecting parts from other sets and combining. They are called a ‘Moccer’, a person who build their own creation (My Own Creation or simply MOC).

I began building sets as a kid, from the basic city/space themes in the 80’s and moved on to Technic in the early 90’s. What comes next after building from instructions, building my own! But what did I build?
I have been a fan of mecha anime shows such as Macross. The actual toys they sold before were nigh expensive. I was still a student then with no means to save enough quickly. All I had was a bucket full of Lego to work with.
Since I haven’t been able to remember all of the process when I was a kid, I’ll just go into the process with how I built my current Valkyrie MOC.

Design with the end MOC in mind

I set out to build what I wanted - a transforming mecha. Macross before only had the VF-1 Valkyrie as it’s transforming mecha, and that’s what I picked. The show provided me with enough data then. Now, the internet’s a treasure trove of official and unofficial art from the show, and even detailing some information on how the transformation system worked.
There were no guides, nor the right parts then… Imagine! It’s Lego after all.

In the 90’s I didn’t have the necessary parts/ or Lego didn’t have the particular part then, nor any reference material. Remember the internet was in its relative infancy, and getting the artbooks cost an arm and a leg. All I had was imagination.

Now with the internet, reference materials are at our fingertips. Lego now has a bigger catalogue of parts making better part selection easier to translate what we have in mind to reality. Access to these parts is easier as well, thanks to sites like Bricklink, and Facebook.

Building a MOC requires imagination. Knowing the parts will translate to knowing what combines to form the end result. Next comes prototyping or building the build.

Moccing, doesn’t end until the builder’s satisfied, it’s a cycle of building and imagining the build until we’re done
I’ve been in this road. I have a slight OC streak when it comes to building, continually improving a build until such time I’m satisfied with it. The build can be ‘done’ until I reach a point that I’m no longer satisfied and rebuild it once again until I’m satisfied.

As for the Valkyrie I made, it went through several versions since the 90’s. Through reference material of the build, and referencing others’ works to inspire, and a little more imagination; the design evolved much that the current build is much more refined than the one I made 20 years ago. It’s actually a good exercise for the mind too!

To summarize, it’s:

  • Design the end MOC in mind - Get a subject to build, it may be something in everyday life, like objects, places or even TV shows
  • There were no guides, nor the right parts then… Imagine! It’s Lego after all – Imagination with Lego is key, it’s a toy that spurs one’s inner creativity. The nice thing about it now is the ease of accessing references to what we’re building, helping out our imagination further.
  • Moccing, doesn’t end until the builder’s satisfied, it’s a cycle of building and imagining the build until we’re done – Building MOCs can end as soon as we start, or it would take a few, or more iterations until we’re satisfied. Now that’s the beauty of building with Lego. We don’t waste material as it’s made to be created and broken down if it’s not into our liking.

Comments

Icyliscious's picture

great read.

shake the bottle, wake the icy"when the going gets rough - tough." 

Super amaze balls!